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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: NETHERLANDS

Much like Diagon Alley, the Dutch School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is hidden behind a nondescript wall on one of the canals of Amsterdam—one only has to tap the right combination of bricks to enter the community of the magic folk. Groups of mermaids can often be seen lounging openly in the maze of canals that carve through the village and campus; when they are feeling especially mischievous, they will tamper with boats carrying students to and fro (which is why students have slowly taken to biking instead). The school takes pride in its large greenhouse that displays an impressive collection of plants grown by Mevrouw Bomgardner’s horticulture class (in which experimentation with carnivorous plants is strictly forbidden following the incident of 1637). Unbeknownst to much of the international magical community, many modern day enchantments commonly cast on paintings originated from experimental Dutch painters who were unsatisfied with mere paint and canvas. 

(via glassgears)

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: JAPAN

In a secluded area of Mount Hiei, shrouded in mist, the Japanese Institute for Magical Practices spirals gracefully into the sky. The school is a series of elegant pagodas built to impossible heights with a multitude of connecting bridges crisscrossing like a bird’s nest. On the ground is an elaborate garden with a sprinkling of ponds. A kaleidoscope of fish zigzag through the water, sometimes even taking to the air like birds due to rather peculiar abilities gained over time through overexposure to magic. Students often take immense pleasure in enchanting a cherry blossom downpour to trail people who have wronged them; the charm usually remains intact for well over a week unless a teacher takes pity upon the student and dispels the spell. While they have mastered wandless magic through the use of talismans, pockets of the Japanese wizarding community have slowly begun to adopt the use of wands following its rise in popularity all over the world, although wandless magic still takes precedence, and wands are more often tucked behind their ears or used to hold up their hair than to practice magic. 

(via glassgears)

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: RUSSIA

The Russian Academy of Magic is a colossal onion-domed structure drifting aimlessly across the surface of Lake Baikal brought to existence using centuries of levitation charms perfected by a group of Russian witches experimenting with portable floating ice rinks. Self-heating fur scarves are all the rage amongst students and professors alike, although they have been known to overheat from time to time, leading to mild cases of heat stroke. When traditional Quidditch games become dull, players would discard their brooms for skates and duke it out on the frozen surface of the lake.

(via glassgears)

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: CHINA

Located in deep in the Guilin mountains, shrouded in mist and frequented by dragons that live in the multitude of winding rivers, the students of the Chinese Institute of Magic don their colourful wizarding garbs every September 1st for their return to school whereupon they are treated to spectacular opening festivities involving, but not limited to: choreographed martial arts performances from their combat professors, an assortment of acrobatic wonders, and “Mystery Mooncakes” specially made for the mid-autumn festival.

(via glassgears)

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: MEXICO

Disguised as a Mayan ruin in the jungles of Chiapas, the Mexican School for Enriched Magical Studies is a sturdy moss-covered structure blanketed by lush greenery. The students are no strangers to muggle tourists ambling about, and will often pose as fellow tourists or locals and interact with them, making them one of the most outgoing, lively, and tolerant communities in the wizarding world. For festivals, students like to don vibrant headdresses, and the school becomes a kaleidoscope of colour as girls twirl around like tops, their skirts lifting up into the air, filling empty space with colour and painting the school with embellished splendour. The campus often reverberates with music from the school’s ghost mariachi band who plays cheerfully day and night; although it tends to get annoying at times, the constant activity makes the school feel like home.

(via glassgears)

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: CANADA

Catering to western students in the vast land of Canada, the Banff Academy of Magical Studies is a sprawling château-style structure nestled comfortably in the snowy peaks beyond Lake Louise. The students have opted for stylish layered knitwear in place of traditional wizard robes, and are often named some of the most fashionable amongst the international wizarding community. Every winter, students would don their warmest clothing and spend hours outside casting adhesive charms on the walls of the academy so falling snow would later stick to the exterior, transforming the school into a frozen palace. 

(via glassgears)

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: INDIA

India’s Academy of Sorcery boasts an impressive display of flashy colours, from enchanted saris that shift colours sporadically throughout the day, to the lavishly painted exterior of the academy which is situated in a nondescript location along Ganges River. Due to the frightening rate at which the school’s ancient mango tree (jokingly nicknamed “Mammoth Mango Machine”) produces mangoes, students have to endure the perpetually evolving art of mango cuisine at least five days a week. Every year, to the students’ great enjoyment, classes are halted for Diwali to make time for various competitions that take place: firework flourishes and charms for upper-year students (bonus points if it doesn’t set any part of the school on fire), and lantern designing for lower-year students (use of animals, alive or dead, is forbidden).

(via glassgears)

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: SOUTH AFRICA

Clinging haphazardly to the jagged sides of the Drakensberg escarpment, the South African Institute for Witches and Wizards is an impressive conglomeration of architectural wonder and eccentric contraptions that keep the sprawling institute welded to the steep slopes of the mountains. Many say roaming the institute is an arduous test of one’s stamina as the primarily vertical layout of the institute relies on a plethora of stairs to navigate (luckily it has gotten better after the restriction on the indoor use of broomsticks was lifted). Over centuries, many pockets of shallow caves have been dug out and furnished by students who like to spend their free time observing the vast landscape before them from high up in the mountainside. The student population supplies much of the profits for Mava’s Zoomtastic Glasses, which is a popular accessory for observing the abundance of wildlife that roam the lands.

(via glassgears)

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: AUSTRALIA

Originally located in Arnhem Land, The Australian College of Sorcery and Witchcraft was a sprawling campus of large huts that eventually coalesced into one single structure. The college detached from mainland Australia soon after British settlement in order maintain their practices and culture. Ever since, the school has been drifting haphazardly in the ocean, although it never strays far from the Australian coast for ancient magic keeps the school tethered to Australian soil. Every year, a team of witches and wizards must be employed to anchor the floating campus so students aren’t forced into a cat-and-mouse chase at the beginning of the year in order to attend school (a frustrating endeavour which often results in the postponing of classes due to a large number of absences). To students’ great enjoyment, various creatures (including the occasional mermaid) can often be found sunbathing around the perimeter of the campus which gently slopes into the water. Due to their exposure to unusually friendly oceanic creatures, the college boasts incredibly extensive courses in aquatic-life studies, and is held in high esteem by the international wizarding community for its innovations in water magic. 

THIS^^^

This is the kind of worldbuilding that Harry Potter SORELY lacked.

Don’t get me wrong, Harry Potter are great books (or at least they are from book 3 onwards, but that’s my opinion). But they are incredibly insular, and whatever elements you do learn about the larger world are pretty much only extended as far as how the relate to the titular character.

This lack of expansive worldbuilding, in my mind, is why Harry Potter is not up there with some of the best fantasy literature like Lord of the Rings. 

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WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: SCANDINAVIA

Formed shortly after the Kalmar Union in protest against Durmstrang’s growing acceptance of the Dark Arts, the Scandinavian Academy for Sorcery Studies is situated in an undetectable location in Hinnøya for students predominantly from Denmark, Norway, and Sweden (and occasionally Finland, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands on account of their historical associations with the region) whose parents preferred for them to be educated in a more sympathetic environment. There is a large heated bubble on the outskirts of campus created for astronomy studies (by far the most popular academic stream at the school) where students can observe the night sky with an unobstructed view. A particular branch of divination correlating to celestial patterns and the movement of stars is studied intensively, and students occupy a large portion of their time speculating various outcomes of the alignment of stars and planets (overheard in the halls: “If Venus and Jupiter had been two degrees closer, I guarantee you I would have found that rogue troll already. The planets have not been helpful lately.”).

I do like the idea of different regions and cultures having different types of magic. 

Like the runes suggest here. 

It would make sense for the Hogwarts and British magic systems to be so Latin based, and then have other parts of the world differ greatly. 

Source: asheathes